Meteorites are some of the rarest objects on Earth. Some meteorites are viewed as cosmic objets d'art, naturally sculpted in the most exquisite forms. Some others made history. Others, rare by their composition, are scientific treasures. The Tricottet Collection of Historic Meteorites consists of rare and aesthetic specimens from primary sources, multi-sources and other rare sources. It also includes historic tektites, an extensive Library of Meteoritics, a unique archive of original manuscripts and correspondence letters, and other rare memorabillia.


This gallery displays a selection of aesthetic and rare meteorite specimens from observed falls, from the early 19th century to the mid-20th century, held by The Tricottet Collection. The journey starts in 1969, a milestone in Meteoritics, with the Allende, Mexico, carbonaceous meteorite fall, the first Antarctica meteorite recoveries and the first return of moon rocks from the Apollo missions. The journey ends at another milestone, in 1803 near L'Aigle, in the countryside of Normandy, France, where Jean-Baptiste Biot, a young scientist of the French Academy of Sciences, changed the perception of rocks falling from the sky, from mystical belief to scientific fact. All meteorite specimens displayed in the gallery have an exceptional historical provenance, as they come from the principal investigators in the recovery of these meteorites in the early days after their fall or from other rare sources.

This gallery displays a selection of aesthetic and rare specimens from meteorite finds, held by The Tricottet Collection. We here take a journey westward around the World, starting in the Great Plains of the United States of America. We then visit the desert craters of Arizona, USA and of Australia. We continue to the Filipino jungle of Bondoc to end in Siberia, near Krasnojarsk. We are accompanied in that journey by famous figures of the meteorite collecting world, such as Harvey H. Nininger, Oscar E. Monnig and Peter S. Pallas. All meteorite specimens displayed in the gallery have an exceptional historical provenance, as they come from the principal investigators in the recovery of these meteorites or from other rare sources.

Tektites (from the Greek τεκτός, molten) have always been objects of fascination. First collected as talismans during prehistoric times, they remained mysterious objects until the late 1960s. Charles Darwin believed tektites were volcanic ejecta (obsidianites) while Harvey H. Nininger thought they were ejecta from lunar volcanoes (lunites). Other possible origins included: rainstorms, lightning (fulgurites), asteroids or comets (meteorites), prehistoric slag and silica gel, to only cite a few. The lunar hypothesis was favoured during the 20th century until lunar rock recoveries (Apollo 11, 1969) disproved the theory. It is now well accepted that tektites are the product of meteoritic impact processes and are therefore affiliated to impactites (which was the hypothesis originally suggested by Spencer in 1933). This gallery presents a selection of historic tektites and impactites... [READ MORE]